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“Cloud Coupling” [kuhp-ling] – Noun: Connecting One Cloud to Another

June 13, 2011 No Comments

I’d like to coin a new industry term: “cloud coupling”. This noun (and also a verb) describes the conjoining of two or more (generally large) data sets across various applications, cloud services and social media streams.

So, “cloud coupling“, say it with us now ☺

This term was thrown up after reading up on a company called SnapLogic this weekend. Describing itself as a ‘cloud connection’ company, SnapLogic recently released SnapReduce — a product designed to connect large data integration between business applications, cloud services, social media and the open source Hadoop software framework that supports data-intensive distributed applications.

See the connection yet?

Picture the scene –

1) A modern company has massive streams and repositories of both structured and unstructured data.

2) Our company not only use Hadoop, but also uses MapReduce, a technology developed by Google almost a decade ago to support distributed computing on large data sets held on computing clusters.

3) Mix the complexity of Hadoop’s computational model, the need to integrate with MapReduce and a combined lack of universal connectivity — and suddenly it becomes really hard for the company to reap business benefits from its so-called “big-data” operation.

Read More of Adrian Bridgewater’s Blog Post on ComputerWeekly.com

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