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Employees Get the Cloud, But IT — Not So Much

February 28, 2012 No Comments

Once again, individuals are ahead of their employers (and IT) in adapting to and exploiting the new technologies

Recently, InfoWorld’s Galen Gruman pointed out that cloud storage is beginning to see productive use — and IT is not having any of it. After all, why let productivity get in the way of preventing an unlikely security threat?

The culprits are Apple’s iCloud, Google Docs, Dropbox, Box.net, and any number of cloud storage systems that provide free or cheap file sharing. Company employees quickly find that using one or two of these services is much easier than dealing with internal IT. Indeed, they may be more aware of the benefit of cloud computing than IT is. There are two primary movers of this.

[ Get the no-nonsense explanations and advice you need to take real advantage of cloud computing in InfoWorld editors’ 21-page Cloud Computing Deep Dive PDF special report. | Stay up on the cloud with InfoWorld’s Cloud Computing Report newsletter. ]

First, employees are working on projects where they need to share files not just with people in the organization but also with those outside (such as contractors). Cloud storage services such as Dropbox and Google Docs provide the quickest way to solve this problem, and they go beyond simple file-sharing capabilities to provide collaboration capabilities.

Second is the use of multiple devices. Employees want access to their files on their work computer, home computer, iPad, iPhone — perhaps even game consoles at some point. Cloud storage services do a good job supporting these devices, whereas internal IT either won’t or can’t support them.

These realities are resulting in a “secret society” of cloud computing users in larger companies who hide their work from IT. They access cloud computing in private to enhance their productivity, which of course helps the company’s bottom line.

Read More of Dave Linthicum’s Blog Post on InfoWorld

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