Inside the Briefcase

2016 APM Reference Guide: Application Performance Monitoring

2016 APM Reference Guide: Application Performance Monitoring

IT Briefcase Analyst Report
This product guide allows you to...

IT Briefcase Exclusive Interview: Top IoT Trends and Predictions for Organizations in 2016

IT Briefcase Exclusive Interview: Top IoT Trends and Predictions for Organizations in 2016

with Mike Martin, nfrastructure
In this interview, Mike Martin,...

Unleash the Power of Global Content

Unleash the Power of Global Content

globeYour business depends on pushing accurate and dynamic content...

Clicking Away Your Right to Privacy

Clicking Away Your Right to Privacy

Before using any standard Internet service provider for e-mail...

Top Questions to Ask Before Implementing VoIP

Top Questions to Ask Before Implementing VoIP

Thinking about a move away from traditional phone lines...

IBM’s New Data Center Analytics

December 7, 2010 No Comments

As if everything wasn’t changing fast enough: Now data centers built for decades need continual redesign.

On Tuesday, IBM will announce it is selling predictive analytics software for the design, planning, maintenance and upgrades of some of business’ biggest cost centers.  Not long ago, these multibillion-dollar computing palaces were built to the same spec for decades. Now, says IBM, they should be under near-continual review.

“Seventy-one percent of data centers are technically obsolete,” says Steven Sams, IBM’s vice president of Global Site and Facilities Services.  “Operating them is five times the cost of building them .” Savings from the new method, he suggested, could be about 30% in operational costs – meaning that over a 30-year lifespan, the savings would pay for the cost of construction. Typical return on investment, he said, had gone from three to five years, to six to 18 months.

The explosion of Internet-based cloud computing services has Sams convinced in predictions that today’s 55 million servers in use worldwide will be 82 million servers in 2013, or that between now and the end of 2012 global data storage capacity may be 6.5 times today’s level. (Those are also the kind of numbers big consultancies and big vendors throw around to scare the bejeezus out of the rest of us. Worked for me.)

Read More of Quentin Hardy’s Blog Post on Forbes.com


Featured Blogs

Leave a Reply

(required)

(required)


ADVERTISEMENT

AnDevCon


American Customer Festival 2016 New York

ITBriefcase Comparison Report

Cyber Security Exchange