Inside the Briefcase

Ironclad SaaS Security for Cloud-Forward Enterprises

Ironclad SaaS Security for Cloud-Forward Enterprises

The 2015 Anthem data breach was the result of...

The Key Benefits of Using Social Media for Business

The Key Benefits of Using Social Media for Business

Worldwide, there are more than 2.6 billion social media...

Gartner IT Sourcing, Procurement, Vendor and Asset Management Summit 2018, September 5 – 7, in Orlando, FL

Gartner IT Sourcing, Procurement, Vendor and Asset Management Summit 2018, September 5 – 7, in Orlando, FL

Register with code GARTITB and save $350 off the...

Infographic: The Three Pillars of Digital Identity: Trust, Consent, Knowledge

Infographic: The Three Pillars of Digital Identity: Trust, Consent, Knowledge

8,434 adults were surveyed to gauge consumer awareness of...

FICO Scales with Oracle Cloud

FICO Scales with Oracle Cloud

Doug Clare, Vice President at FICO, describes how Oracle...

Social Software, Feature or Product?

October 24, 2011 No Comments

We have this debate running about social software and whether it’s, for the most part anyway, a set of features that should be embedded in other products / platforms, or long term stand-a-lone products. The evolution of new applications can take a few different paths but there seems to be a pattern of sorts. It goes like this, some one sees a business need (or opportunity to create awareness of a need) and builds some software to address that need.

Others see the need and either 1. copy the feature set as their own product, 2. create a competing but different product or 3. extend an existing product to meet the business need. All of these can exist simultaneously but if the product in #3 has a strong market following already it often spells the death of #1 and #2 (death by acquisition, or by changing direction, or by going out of business).Once the product exists there are a few ways that the story plays out:

  • The product has unique value and develops a rich feature set that defines the new market – survives as a stand-a-lone product and market
  • The product has value but is not unique enough to survive on its own, thus it becomes a feature of some other product.
  • The product and feature set are unique and the foundation for a new approach to solving some business problems, becoming a next generation platform (and probably pulls in a few other features / products as well)

Read More of Micheal Fauscette’s Blog Post on Enterprise Irregulars

Featured Blogs

Leave a Reply

(required)

(required)


ADVERTISEMENT

Gartner