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IT Briefcase Exclusive Interview: Keeping Your (Manufacturing) Head in the Clouds

IT Briefcase Exclusive Interview: Keeping Your (Manufacturing) Head in the Clouds

with Srivats Ramaswami, 42Q
In this interview, Srivats Ramaswami,...

IT Briefcase Exclusive Interview: New Solutions Keeping Enterprise Business Ahead of the Game

IT Briefcase Exclusive Interview: New Solutions Keeping Enterprise Business Ahead of the Game

with Sander Barens, Expereo
In this interview, Sander Barens...

IT Briefcase Exclusive Interview: The Tipping Point – When Things Changed for Cloud Computing

IT Briefcase Exclusive Interview: The Tipping Point – When Things Changed for Cloud Computing

with Shawn Moore, Solodev
In this interview, Shawn Moore,...

Driving Better Outcomes through Workforce Analytics Webcast

Driving Better Outcomes through Workforce Analytics Webcast

Find out what’s really going on in your business...

Legacy Modernization: Look to the Cloud and Open Systems

Legacy Modernization: Look to the Cloud and Open Systems

On the surface, mainframe architecture seems relatively simple: A...

Social Software, Feature or Product?

October 24, 2011 No Comments

We have this debate running about social software and whether it’s, for the most part anyway, a set of features that should be embedded in other products / platforms, or long term stand-a-lone products. The evolution of new applications can take a few different paths but there seems to be a pattern of sorts. It goes like this, some one sees a business need (or opportunity to create awareness of a need) and builds some software to address that need.

Others see the need and either 1. copy the feature set as their own product, 2. create a competing but different product or 3. extend an existing product to meet the business need. All of these can exist simultaneously but if the product in #3 has a strong market following already it often spells the death of #1 and #2 (death by acquisition, or by changing direction, or by going out of business).Once the product exists there are a few ways that the story plays out:

  • The product has unique value and develops a rich feature set that defines the new market – survives as a stand-a-lone product and market
  • The product has value but is not unique enough to survive on its own, thus it becomes a feature of some other product.
  • The product and feature set are unique and the foundation for a new approach to solving some business problems, becoming a next generation platform (and probably pulls in a few other features / products as well)

Read More of Micheal Fauscette’s Blog Post on Enterprise Irregulars

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