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The Importance of Many Clouds

May 4, 2011 No Comments

Looking forward to the Redhat Summit this week in Boston with a theme of “Platform, Middleware, Virtualization, Cloud”. The cloud market is dominated by a lot of startups, with some goliath-size companies still waiting in the wings. Depending your point of view, they are either lumbering dinosaurs unaware of the next evolutionary shift, or if you are like me, I think they are poised to strike. If you believe enterprise adoption is the next wave of cloud adoption, then these organizations have huge salesforces with deep customer relationships and services organizations capable of assisting enterprises with the transition to cloud. They have knowledge on the workload profiles that are the essential first step in determining what in the enterprise is suited to cloud deployment.

Many of the workloads running on the infrastructure of these vendors would require significant re-architecting to take advantage of the cloud. These workloads would most likely be the trailing adopters with the more urgent being redeveloped on a new infrastructure platform. If my previous employer (Sun Microsystems) grew up as the platform of choice for the Internet, then Redhat grew up in the era of the commodity architectures made famous by Google and the social networking phenoms. Redhat technology (Linux, JBoss, etc..) supports a large number of the more modern application workloads that are suitable for cloud deployment. They are not to be underestimated.

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