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Driving Better Outcomes through Workforce Analytics Webcast

Driving Better Outcomes through Workforce Analytics Webcast

Find out what’s really going on in your business...

Legacy Modernization: Look to the Cloud and Open Systems

Legacy Modernization: Look to the Cloud and Open Systems

On the surface, mainframe architecture seems relatively simple: A...

Still keeping your hybrid power systems indoors?  It’s time for change.

Still keeping your hybrid power systems indoors? It’s time for change.

Mobile telecommunications network equipment is expected to work without...

As the Network Changes, Engineers Are Embracing the DevOps Model

As the Network Changes, Engineers Are Embracing the DevOps Model

Businesses that have embraced digital transformation with a clear...

The 5 Most Common Application Bottlenecks

The 5 Most Common Application Bottlenecks

Application bottlenecks can lead an otherwise functional computer or...

Why Hasn’t Google Put ChromeOS Out to Pasture?

December 5, 2011 No Comments

Google has been on a killing spree the last few months, whacking projects that are non-essential to the company strategy or that haven’t caught on. Even though this has angered some users, Google is still stubbornly clinging to one of its biggest dogs to date: ChromeOS and the Chromebooks.

Google announced the ChromeOS in July 2009, and finally started shipping them to consumers in June of this year. (Not counting Cr-48s, which weren’t commercially available.)

While Google has been extremely successful with the Chrome browser, it seems home users and businesses are much less enthusiastic about an operating system based on the browser. According to a recent report in The Register Chromebook sales are “unlikely to exceed 30,000 units.”

To compare, Google claims 500,000 Android devices activated every day. Clearly, Chromebook sales leave a lot to be desired.

Why Chromebooks Didn’t Take Off
It’s not really hard to see why Chromebooks haven’t taken off. ChromeOS is a nifty operating system, but it’s just not competitive with Windows or Mac OS X, or really even with iOS or Android. Web applications only take you so far, and a device that always needs a connection is problematic.

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