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Why Tech Might Be The Silver Lining For The Health Industry

September 10, 2019 No Comments

Featured article by Sally Writes, Independent Technology Author

digital healthcare 300x151 Why Tech Might Be The Silver Lining For The Health Industry

Chronic diseases have recently come under the spotlight as it’s not only taxing to the individual, but also how they have a ripple effect on the economy. A recent study revealed that 50% of Australians have a chronic disease, which places health insurance, the workplace, and the patient’s personal finances under severe pressure. But there might just be a way that chronic diseases receive a boost. Not from further pharmaceutical development, but rather a technological boost. Will tech revolutionize the way our health insurance is managed? Perhaps.

Tech Development Charter Cites Chronic Disease As High Priority 

One of the major challenges that chronic patients face, is the access to treatment and monitoring systems that allow them to actively manage their diseases when they’re not in a medical facility. Digitally enabled models of care are currently being tested with the hopes of rolling out the systems as early as 2022. For chronic patients, this could have a positive impact on the way they manage a chronic disease, and could also provide more concise information to both insurers and medical facilities. Digital management also means digital monitoring, which could provide researchers with critical information on how to manage the disease better. This information might also have an effect on the way insurance companies classify chronic diseases.

Type 2 Diabetes Under The Microscope 

280 new cases of Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes is diagnosed every day, which places severe financial pressure on health insurance companies and patients’ pockets. This figure is set to triple over the next 20 years if there is no intervention or change. In order to manage their health, NIB health insurance encourages Australians to participate in regular screenings to catch insulin resistance before Diabetes sets in. Mobile devices are used to monitor health and fitness levels, as diet and exercise have both been found to play a significant role in the prevention and care of diabetes. It’s also vital that those who have a family history of diabetes schedule regular checkups with their doctor, especially if their waist circumference is high and if they’re over the age of 45.

CSIRO Encouraging The Use Of Apps 

Health management is a critical component of managing a chronic disease, and those who are serious about taking their health into their own hands can use industry-approved apps to help them along the journey. The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) is known to promote the use of technology to detect and manage chronic diseases. These apps not only help in reminding patients of treatments or times to take their medication, they also provide vital information that could help save the life of a patient. For instance, if their heart rate picks up or slows down beyond a safe range. The smartphone apps are also a great help to outpatients who don’t have easy access to medical facilities. Technology provides the missing information that medical professionals and insurance providers need in order to manage their chronic patients more effectively.

HEALTH IT

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