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Cybercrime disclosures rare despite new SEC rule

July 2, 2012 No Comments

SOURCE: Yahoo News

Hackers broke into computers at Wyndham Worldwide Corp. three times in two years and stole credit card information belonging to hundreds of thousands of customers. Wyndham didn’t report the break-in in corporate filings even though the Securities and Exchange Commission wants companies to inform investors of cybercrimes.

Amid whispers of sensational online break-ins resulting in millions of dollars in losses, it remains remarkably difficult to identify corporate victims of cybercrimes. Companies are afraid that going public would damage their reputations, sink stock prices or spark lawsuits.

The chairman of the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va., is adding a provision to cybersecurity legislation that would strengthen the reporting requirement. The SEC’s cybersecurity guidance issued in October is not mandatory. It was intended to update for the digital age a requirement that companies report “material risks” that investors want to know.

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SECURITY

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