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IT Briefcase Exclusive Interview: Keeping Your (Manufacturing) Head in the Clouds

IT Briefcase Exclusive Interview: Keeping Your (Manufacturing) Head in the Clouds

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IT Briefcase Exclusive Interview: New Solutions Keeping Enterprise Business Ahead of the Game

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IT Briefcase Exclusive Interview: The Tipping Point – When Things Changed for Cloud Computing

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Driving Better Outcomes through Workforce Analytics Webcast

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Legacy Modernization: Look to the Cloud and Open Systems

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Solstice Lunar Eclipse

December 20, 2010 No Comments

FUN FACT! (outside of the Business Integration realm) The last lunar eclipse on the northern Winter Solstice was in 1638. Don’t miss the one tonight!

On Dec. 21st, the first day of northern winter, when the full Moon passes almost dead-center through Earth’s shadow. For 72 minutes of eerie totality, an amber light will play across the snows of North America, throwing landscapes into an unusual state of ruddy shadow.

The eclipse begins on Tuesday morning, Dec. 21st, at 1:33 am EST (Monday, Dec. 20th, at 10:33 pm PST). At that time, Earth’s shadow will appear as a dark-red bite at the edge of the lunar disk. It takes about an hour for the “bite” to expand and swallow the entire Moon. Totality commences at 02:41 am EST (11:41 pm PST) and lasts for 72 minutes.

If you’re planning to dash out for only one quick look – it is December, after all – choose this moment: 03:17 am EST (17 minutes past midnight PST). That’s when the Moon will be in deepest shadow, displaying the most fantastic shades of coppery red.

Source: NASA Science

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